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CSIR bioplastic technology recognised for its potential to eradicate plastic pollution

Publication Date: 
Wednesday, June 13, 2018

The CSIR’s bioplastic technology has been recognised by the Eco-Logic awards 2018 for making a positive contribution towards creating a sustainable world. The awards ceremony, held on World Environment Day, 5 June 2018, placed the CSIR’s bioplastic technology in the spotlight.

Contact Person

Dr Sudhakar Muniyasamy

smuniyasamy@csir.co.za

The CSIR’s bioplastic technology has been recognised by the Eco-Logic awards 2018 for making a positive contribution towards creating a sustainable world.

The awards ceremony, held on World Environment Day, 5 June 2018, placed the CSIR’s bioplastic technology in the spotlight. The CSIR technology won the silver award in the Eco-Innovation Award category for a new, innovative product that can potentially change the lives of South Africans whilst solving the earth’s plastic pollution challenge.

One of the key features that made this technology a winner is that after use, these bioplastic products are 100% compostable and undergo complete biodegradation within 3-6 months, without any toxic residues. An additional feature of the CSIR bioplastic technology is that it displays good mechanical properties that are similar to those of the conventional non-biodegradable polyethylene films and it can be processed using existing industrial equipment.

“We were particularly pleased to receive the CSIR bioplastic technology entry as plastic pollution has become such a huge current environmental issue that urgently needs to be addressed. We were therefore delighted that the CSIR is applying its mind to address this critical issue,” said David Parry-Davies from Enviropedia, the company that established the Eco-Logic awards back in 2011.

The Eco-Innovation award category recognises a new product or service that is financially viable and sustainable, and that serves the needs of humans while being equally beneficial to the earth and eco-systems. CSIR senior researcher in polymers and composites and lead developer of the technology, Dr Sudhakar Muniyasamy says the technology will contribute to the reduction of environmental pollution and boost local job creation in manufacturing.

“As a team we are very glad that the CSIR research and development work has been recognised in this way. This is an indication that the work will have an impact on society and reduce plastic pollution. We hope to get the necessary support to take it to the market,” says Muniyasamy.

This year’s ceremony was made possible by a number of sponsors including the Department of Environmental Affairs, Eskom and the City of Tshwane.